Author Archives: Little Patch of Ground

About Little Patch of Ground

"...a little patch of ground, that hath in it no profit but the name."

August

-Auchmis detersa-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Heliothis maritima-
Mácsonya-veteménybagoly/Shoulder-striped Clover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Helicoverpa armigera-
Gyapottok-bagolylepke/Scarce-bordered straw. A pest of tomatoes and sweetcorn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Argiope bruennichi-
Darázspók/Wasp spider. Lays its eggs in undisturbed grass. Can’t survive in regularly mown lawns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Pelurga comitata-
Tarkaaraszoló/Dark Spinach

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Early June

Leaf beetle. Labistomis?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trichodes apiarius/ Szalagos méhészbogár. Attractive black and red striped beetles often seen on flower heads in the sunshine. They lay their eggs in bees’ nests and the larvae are parasitic there. Adults eat pollen but this is basically a carnivorous species: they will also prey on other insects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light Emerald moth, hardly green at all, but a brilliant pearly white. ‘Pearl’ is in the Latin name (Campaea margaritata). On mint.

Zygaena.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marbled White (Sakktáblalepke). On Smoke bush (Cserszömörce).

 

Marbled White underside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marbled White. Dead, unfortunately. Road kill.

Nine-spotted moth or Yellow-belted Burnet (fehérpettyes álcsüngőlepke). Amata phegea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotted Longhorn (Rutpela maculata). Tarkacsápú karcsúcincér.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heath Fritillary (Melitaea athalia). Közönséges tarkalepke.

Lurking at the woodland’s rim

A small selection of the plants and insects seen last weekend (May 21–22):

Dictamnus albus (Burning bush, Nagyezerjófű). Tall and stately by the sides of woodland paths. In high summer it exudes a faintly lemon-sented sticky substance which is highly flammable. Perhaps the Burning Bush of the Bible was formed from clump of them.

Zygaena loti (Slender Scotch burnet, Közönséges csüngőlepke). A pair of them on dianthus. Beautiful day-flying moths. These were at the edge of a woodland ride.

Lycaena tityrus (Sooty copper, Barna tűzlepke). In the garden, flying among tall, unmown grass in strong wind.

Coenagrion pulchellum (Variable damselfly, Gyakori légivadász). Coming in great numbers to the nettles by the lakeside.

Cercopis vulnerata (Black-and-red froghopper, Vérehullató kabóca). Terrible picture but it hopped away before I could focus on it.

Colias crocea (Clouded yellow, Sáfránylepke). Flitting erratically, hardly ever settling, in a dry meadow.

 

 

 

 

Pontia daplidice (Bath white, Rezedalepke). In quite large numbers along a sunny woodland ride.